I made good use of my extended stay in England and  attended the UK IGF held on 1st July 2014 at St. Ermin’s hotel, London, England. The Nominet Chair Baroness Rennie Fritchie gave the sponsor’s welcoming remarks. She said “The IGF provides an opportunity for discussion, dialogue, divergent views, and encourages people to speak-up”. The event had about 50 participants. The Minister for Culture, Communication and the Creative Industries Hon. Ed Vaizey, MP appeared briefly to give his keynote speech and fielded questions from participants.

At the UK IGF. Kivuva, Minister  Hon. Ed Vaizey, MP, and Adrian discussing bilateral relations

At the 2014 UK IGF. From Left Mwendwa Kivuva, Minister Hon. Ed Vaizey, MP, and Adrian Rodriguez

The agenda had 6 items:

  1. Net Governance: Net Mundial, London High Level Governance Meeting, now what?
  2. IANA functions
  3. Governance of cybersecurity
  4. IPv6
  5. Network filtering plenary
  6. Wrap-up and key takeaway from the IGF.

Despite the low turnout -(attributed to conference fatigue at ICANN) the discussions were healthy with key takeaways. The government was taken to task on her position on NetNeutrality, which she seemed to contradict herself with no clear position. However, the Minister stated UK is concerned on the kind of regulation being discussed in Europe that would stifle businesses. The IGF organizers were also not able to clearly indicate how the outcome of previous IGFs were used to influence policy, only stating that multistakeholderism and being able to talk to each other was part of the success of the IGF. The UK also stated she was able to adjust policy positions from outcomes of the IGF and have UK positions in bilateral talks with greater EU. However, there was no example given on these positions. Mr. Vaizey noted there is need to strengthen IGF locally and internationally.

UK Internet Governance position for the IGF

The session on Internet Governance landscape identified the following positions for the UK

  • Resist attempt to give priority to single stakeholders – have a more dynamic model
  • Keep the IGF open and balanced
  • Keep vested interests out of the process.
  • Have IGF outcomes stakeholders can take home to aid in capacity building. Use IGF as a forum to address local problem.
  • Make the IGF more focused, and identify the big issues to be discussed.
  • The IGF is all about lobbying. (Seems to contradict point 3. above)
  • True democratic governments are a minority
  • Looking for climatic help from state is the norm. It would be difficult to achieve multistakeholderism while states have more strength.
  • Focus on involving more businesses on the IGF. Content Providers, ISPs, and industries affected by  the Internet.
  • Rebuild trust among stakeholders locally and internationally.

It was appreciated that the IGF landscape has changed greatly. For example, at NetMundial, all stakeholders were treated equally with Civil Society, private Sector, Government, and Technical Community all queuing up to the microphone to make their submissions. IANA stewardship was identified as a positive step taken by USG’s NTIA. A key point was that the idea of human rights has become more mainstream in Internet Governance.

One hindrance identified to multistakeholderism was the fact that not all stakeholders understand the issues being discusses. An example is eight out of nine US Supreme Court judged do not use emails. What kind of decisions would they make if IG issues were presented in their courts?

Relevance of the Istanbul IGF.

  • NetNeutrality will be a big debate in Istanbul.
  • Ongoing support for the IGF and fundraising.
  • How to make the IGF feel like an open platform.
  • How to achieve consensus to develop an outcome document from the IGF
  • The IGF offers capacity building, and many participants find answers to local problems.

The IPv6 Session

The session covered updates on IPv6 addressing use in UK and explored the potential barriers to it’s adoption. The panel was chaired by Olivier Crépin-Leblond Chair of ISOC UK England, with panelists being Alain Fiocco of CISCO, Tim Chown of University of Southampton, and Adrian Kennard Andrew and Arnold Ltd.

It was noted that UK is trailing other European countries in roll-out of IPv6. The global growth of IPv6 roll-out was at around 8% as of 2014. The challenges identified that face the implementation of IpV6 were:

  1. Traditionally lack of Content on IPv6. It’s hard to convince people to use IPv6 without content hosted on it. Now there is massive content on IPv6 and clients need to access this content.
  2. There were few IPv6 transit providers. Now there are many directly commuter BGP transit points.
  3. In the past, there were Few equipment especially core routers and client premise equipment that supported IPv6. Now most devices are IPv6 compliant.
  4. There is a high cost of upgrading the Internet backbone to support IPv6 by large ISPs
  5. Bugs on equipment that were to be IPv6 compliant. Most equipment are now bug-free.
  6. Affordability of consumer routers. Low end routers did not have IPv6 support. Most of these technical hurdles have been solved already.
  7. lack of Operating System support. Now, most Operating Systems are IPv6 compliant.
  8. Use of Career Grade NAT (CGN) and Large Scale NAT (LSN) which are presented as IPv6. This prevents operators from rolling out pure IPv6 networks. The CGN is not scalable, and the end users have poor network experience.
  9. What is left? Cost of change. We need technical staff to understand issues around IPv6. Staff need to be trained including engineers, support team, and call center operators. There need to be more affordable equipment in the market that support IPv6. There need to be demand from the end users for IPv6 content, and IPv6 connectivity.

It was identified that as of July 2014, only 4% of the Internet  users had access to IPv6. The big players like Google, Wikipedia, Yahoo, Facebook, Microsoft, e.t.c are on IPv6. A key point was the driver for IPv6 roll-out seemed to be innovation and not demographics.

The Network filtering session came into a conclusion that education was more desirable in protecting minors online instead of blocking websites since the minors could still access the content from other devices elsewhere.

The wrap-up session was a Q&A session between Kate Russell, freelance Journalist and BBC Click presenter with Eleanor Bradley, CEO of Nominet.

NB: Key take-away from the IGF: Possible areas of research – IPv6 uptake in Kenyan Universities. Universities are agents of change in society, and they usually have good budget. Why are they not leading the way in implementing IPv6?


The warmth of the genuinely friendly and hospitable Balinese people in the famous Indonesian archipelago of Bali together with the sunny and warm tropical weather emanating form the Bali sea was a clear indication the 8thGlobal Internet Governance Forum (IGF) would be fruitful and lead to positive outcomes. The tone had already been set by the environment.

Scenic Bali Sea beach
Scenic Bali Sea beach

The IGF capacity building pre-event organized by Internet Society had all global ISOC Ambassadors and ISOC fellows from the Asian Pacific region participate in topics of their interests that had an impact on the Internet in their respective regions. The discussions took the un-conference format where every individual from Australia to Argentina, from Kenya to Costa Rica, from Vanuatu to Uganda, from Venezuela to Russia, all felt comfortable and they could contribute without pressure.

Inside the Fishbowl

The discussions were done through the interesting and unique fishbowl method where seven debaters sat in the middle of a two tier circle, with an eight slot available for the other members sited outside the center ring to fill if they felt the need to contribute to the debate. Only those on the inside circle could contribute, and one had to exit the circle through peer pressure and join the outside circle to maintain the balance to seven debaters if the eight slot was occupied. A prefect would ensure fishbowl rules were followed; and a scribe would note all the key-points that emerge form the debate, but neither of them could contribute to the discussions.

A Fishbowl in session
A Fishbowl in session. Extream right, Ms. Toral Cowieson, Senior Director, Internet Leadership was the Prefect 

Interesting debates from different Internet related problems from across the globe were tackled, some of them being

  1. How do we create contacts within local stakeholders, running projects for the chapter and extending support to local community.
  2. Best practices in financial management of ISOC chapters including fund-raising and grants
  3. Setting ISOC chapter’s objectives and goals
  4. If we work on a project it would be … with … and jointly we can achieve …
  5. What is my role in my chapter to shape up the future of Internet in my community … and what do I need to do …
  6. ISOC chapters contribute most effectively to the Internet Governance if …
  7. Online Intermediaries and human rights : Embracing transparency, accountability and Trust in the Digital era.
  8. What is preventing effective Cyber security in developing countries? Are policymakers not aware of the severity of the issues and multitude of responses required (people, process and tech), and as much haven’t made Cyber security a national priority.
  9. Use of the Internet to support creative economy and sustainable development
  10. Child safety online: What is the role of parents in ensuring that children are safe online?
  11. Best practices in building community of learning. How do we create peer networks that build capacity building to Internet Governance?

The fishbowl is an interesting way of brainstorming and coming up with new ideas for contemporary problems that affect us. I consider this a key takeaway from the ISOC Ambassadorial program because we can use it in our local ISOC chapter meetings where all members will feel welcomed and encouraged to contribute. It can also be used in our day to day jobs , in meetings where we sometimes struggle to get members engaged.

The solution room.

This was a more interesting method of getting solutions for participants that had Internet related problems in their region. On the solution room, eight participants sat on a round-table and asked to write down their problem in a paper glued infront of each one of them. Participants then moved clockwise one position, but left their problem behind. Now the problem became the problem of the whole group, where they brainstormed around it as the members sited infront of the problem scribed the solutions offered. All the problems would be solved clockwise until the last. Each member would then take the solution for adoption in solving the respective problem presented.

The Solution Room

The Solution Room


2013 was a fruitful year for me after participating in both the first African Summer School on Internet Governance in Durban South Africa, the 47th ICANN meeting in Durban as an ICANN Fellow, and being selected the Internet society Ambassador to the IGF in Bali, Indonesia. The theme of the IGF is Building Bridges – Enhancing Multistakeholder Cooperation for Growth and Sustainable Development.

Other 2013 Ambassadors are: http://www.internetsociety.org/what-we-do/education-and-leadership-programmes/next-generation-leaders/Current-Ambassadors

Alejandro Acosta

Alejandro Acosta (Venezuela) is currently Technology Support Manager at British Telecom (BT). He is a member of LACNIC’s Electoral Commission and President of LAC-TF (the IPv6 Task Force). He coordinates the annual meeting of the Latin American IPv6 Forum and moderates the Latin American IPv6 Task Force mailing list. He also is Professor of TCP/IP at the Nueva Esparta University, a course for 9th semester students. Alejandro is a member of LACNIC, IETF

Anupam Agrawal

Anupam Agrawal (India) is a Presales & Enterprise Solutions Lead for Tata Consultancy Services. He is a Chartered Accountant (CA) and also holds a number of industry certifications in areas such as IT auditing and business performance management. He is currently pursuing a qualification in Cyber Crime Investigation at the Asian School of Cyber Laws. He is also an inductee of the Information Technology Committee of Bengal Chamber of Commerce.

Andrés Azpúrua

Andrés Azpúrua (Venezuela) is the Director/Co-Founder at Venezuela Inteligente, an organization that develops and facilitates technology tools for civic engagement. He completed his Diploma in Leadership and Public Policy at IESA, UCAB, Fundación Futuro Presente in Caracas, Venezuela. Andrés is an Internet Freedom Fellow with interests in the areas of human rights, access and diversity and IG4D (Internet Governance for development).

Nabil Benamar

Nabil Benamar (Morocco) works as a Professor of Computer Science at the Moulay Ismail University. He holds a Master’s degree in Computer Networks and a PhD in Computer Science from the Moulay Ismail University. Nabil has extensive experience in IPv6, DNS, security and privacy, open source culture, and networking.

Cecilia Bermudez

Cecilia Bermudez (Venezuela) currently works as a Teaching Assistant in the School of Systems Engineering at the Universidad de los Andes in Merida, Venezuela. Cecilia is pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Systems Engineering at the Unidad Educativa Colegio María Inmaculada. Her topics of interest are access and diversity, critical Internet resources and security and privacy.

Fawaz Bokhari

Fawaz Bokhari (Pakistan) from Lahore is an Assistant Professor at the Punjab University College of Information Technology (P.U.C.I.T). His research interests include computer networks and distributed and cloud computing. Currently, he is working on designing efficient communication protocols (transport and network layer) for data centers. He also teaches an introductory level cloud computing course to graduate students.

Nicolas Caballero

Nicolas Caballero (Paraguay) is the Vice President of Omnia S.A. He completed his Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science at the Universidad Autónoma de Asunción, Paraguay, specializing in Networking and the Internet. He is currently the Paraguay representative to the ICANN Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC). Mr. Caballero is very interested in the areas of access and diversity, critical Internet resources, openness and security, and IG4D (Internet governance for development).

Oswaldo Cali

Oswaldo Cali (Venezuela) is a Lawyer specializing in human rights, and is currently an Officer of the Promotion, Defense and Public Action Program. His work is predominantly in the field of freedom of expression, and he carries out studies of legislation and policies in Venezuela and participates in related national and international campaigns. He graduated from the Universidad Metropolitana in Caracas, Venezuela with an Abogado (Juris Doctor equivalent).

Raitme Citterio

Raitme Citterio (Venezuela) is a computer engineer and graduate from UCLA – University Lisandro Alvarado. His specialty is management and development of knowledge and learning communities online.  As a consultant in the area of e-Learning, he works on issues of regional leadership and building capacity for the region. He is a member of the Royal Venezuela – Graduates of training programs in Latin America-Caribbean international cooperation programs of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

Natalia Enciso

Natalia Enciso (Paraguay) is an Attorney-at-Law and a Professor at the Universidad Autónoma de Asunción (UAA). Her work is concentrated in the areas of online trust and identity, e-Commerce, e-Government, data protection, and mediation. Ms. Enciso is especially interested in human rights and exploring how proposed legislations such as SOPA, PIPA, and CISPA relate to censorship and freedom of expression.

Teuku Geumpana

Teuku Geumpana (Indonesia) is presently employed by the BINUS International, School of Computer Science as a Program Coordinator. He holds a Bachelors of Information Technology from the International Islamic University of Malaysia. He was also awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to complete his Masters in Management Information Systems at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. He is presently conducting academic research in the areas of software engineering, cloud computing, distributed systems and wireless mobile application

Argyro Karanasiou

Argyro Karanasiou (Greece) is a Lecturer in Law and a Research Fellow at the Center for Intellectual Property, Policy and Management (CIPPM), Bournemouth University. She is currently at the end of her PhD studies at the Center of International Governance (CfIG) in the University of Leeds. Her doctoral research focuses on the intersection of new technologies and human rights, predominantly freedom of speech. She is a member of the Open Right’s Group Academic Network, the Global Internet Governance Academic Network and the Society of Legal Scholars.

Sarah Kiden

Sarah Kiden (Uganda) currently works as a Web & E-Learning Administrator at the Uganda Christian University. She holds an MSc in Information Systems from the Uganda Martyrs University and completed her BSc studies in Information Technology at the Uganda Christian University. She is a DiploFoundation Fellow, ICANN47 Fellow and has served on the Nominating Committee (Nomcom) of the Internet Governance Caucus. Sarah was one of the co-organizers of the TedxKiraTownWomen event in Uganda in 2012.

Mwendwa Kivuva

Mwendwa Kivuva (Kenya) from Nairobi is an ICT Administrator at the University of Nairobi. He is a member of the Kenya and East African IGF Steering Committee, and a regular participant in the Kenya ICT Action Network group (KICTAnet), Kenya Internet Governance Forums (IGF) and the Kenya Network Information Center (KENIC). He is an ICANN47 Fellow and an AFRINIC16 Fellow. His interests are IG4D (Internet governance for development), ICT policy and human rights on the Internet.

May-Ann Lim

May-Ann Lim (Singapore) currently works as the Research Director at TRPC. Her career has spanned a number of regional and global institutions, including the World Bank, the Singapore Institute of International Affairs, and the Singapore Internet Project. Her interests include telecommunication networks and ICT policy, new media and communications, technology developments and applications, mobile platforms, disaster relief and development work in universal education, and access to finance.

Sheba Mohammid

Sheba Mohammid (Trinidad & Tobago) is a multidisciplinary Internet professional with a background that includes experience working in digital inclusion, ICT policy and strategy, sustainable development, Internet governance, e-Learning and behavioral science of cyberspace. She is a Commonwealth Fellow and an African Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Fellow to the IGF. Sheba is currently the Director of Policy and Implementation at the Global Social Media Impact Study, European Research Council.

Sergey Ovcharenko

Sergey Ovcharenko (Russian Federation) is a Trainee Researcher at the Joint Supercomputer Center of the Russian Academy of Science. He is also the Director for .SU Domain Development at the Foundation for Internet Development in Moscow. He holds a BSc in Applied Physics and Mathematics and an MSc in Mathematical and Information Technology from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. His work experience is in the areas of ccTLD management, embedded systems development and network security research.

Roxana Radu

Roxana Radu (Romania) is a PhD candidate in International Relations/Political Science at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. Previously, she worked as a Programme Coordinator and Researcher with the Center for Media and Communication Studies (CMCS) at the Central European University. Ms. Radu is interested in new media regulation, social uses of new technologies, and civil society empowerment.

Cintra Sooknanan

Cintra Sooknanan (Trinidad & Tobago) is an Attorney-at-Law. She holds a BSc in Computing and a LLB from the University of London, and a LLM from Staffordshire University. Ms. Sooknanan has a long involvement with ICT non-profits and has served as the Director of the Trinidad & Tobago Computer Society. She is the Chair of the Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter and Vice-Chair of the new gTLD Working Group at ICANN.

Filiz Yilmaz

Filiz Yilmaz (Turkey) is an Internet Governance & Policy Consultant. She has extensive work experience in the Internet industry in roles specific to resource management, policy, engagement, participation and strategic communications. She is the former Senior Director of Participation and Engagement at ICANN, and is currently the Programme Committee Chair at RIPE NCC. She is also a Founding Member of the ISOC Turkey Chapter.


The first African Internet Governance Summer School held at Hotel 64 Gordon in Durban kicked off on 9th July 2013 with an introductory dinner. The diversity of participants, presenters and facilitators across Africa and the world was amazing.

Presenters with rich knowledge on Internet Governance were lined up from NEPAD, ICANN (NCUC), Afrinic, APC, Afilias, CGI.br, .ZADNA, University of Aarhus, and University of Zuric among others.

On day two, participants volunteered to role-play by belonging to different stakeholder groups of either Civil society, Government, Media, Private sector, Academia, and Technical community, where they were expected to develop a policy document of an IG topic of their choice. During plenary, the stakeholder groups worked hard to undo the policy documents of the opposing side until consensus was reached on the policy documents presented by each stakeholder group. The moderators and Chairman were keen to control the Stakeholders who had heated debates.

Participants of the Internet Governance School

Participants of the African Internet Governance School

The networking opportunity for the school was great with participants mingling freely and exchanging ideas, information, and lessons learned on IG issues from their respective regions.

The IG school came to a close on 12th July with participants presented beautiful certificates, and facilitators awarded tokens of appreciation. The event could not be complete without the Closing Dinner Sponsored by APC and NCUC held at Spiga d’Oro, 200 Florida Road, just near our hotel  Florida Park.


Internet Governance Forum (IGF) in Kenya is very mature, with like 5 past events. including hosting the east Africa, Africa, and world IGF.

Lessons learned.

Other countries across the world wonder how Kenya has made it. I have had others say they are waiting for government to start their local IGF initiatives. Government and business do not sponsor the event but always shows up to defend themselves because they are usually the punching bag at the events. Nobody would sponsor an event where they are put under scrutiny.

It’s usually a hectic process arranging the IGF, with totally no funding, but we always find ourselves exceeding expectations. How do we do it?

Local participation from like minded individuals and enthusiasm is all that counts. And a little donation from members of the IGF working group, as we have done in 2013.

Advice

If your country has no national Internet Governance initiative, just form a network of like-minded
individuals and brainstorm on how to convene one. The twist is the Internet Governance Forum should be before your regional Internet Governance Forum, and the continental Internet Governance Forum so that you can use the deliberations at the national level to feed into the regional, continental and world agenda.