I’ve been active in At-large’s AFRALO as the Internet Society Kenya Chapter Secretary General and ALS representative. Before ICANN50 I did not know much about other communities like NCUC, NPOC … what are they? ūüôā

So I had a personal goal

“Challenge yourselves to look at other communities and their way of working through the multistakeholder process and discover information that you may not already know about ICANN that can help you moving foreword.” – Janice’s clarion call

I met and re-established contact with many ICANN and AFRALO African leaders like Pierre Dandjinou, Abdelaziz Hilali, and Tijani Ben Jemaa.

We discussed at lengths with Lars-Johan Liman of Netnod and Root Server System Advisory Committee on ways to volunteer at¬†RSSAC. RSSAC is in the process of getting more volunteers involved, especially those with different skill sets, not just the traditional geek. I’m still considering how helpful I can be if I join this group.

Sentiment analysis and Opinion mining is a new area in social media Business Intelligence analysis. Through much persistence, I was able to discuss with Aba Diakite, the ICANN Senior Manager for Business Intelligence on how ICANN can get instant feedback from the community just by analyzing social media posts. Aba was positive and promised to get back to me after discussing with the high and might at ICANN.


So I was privileged to be a mentor for two newcomers, One from Venezuela and another from West Bank. Not because I know anything really, but because I had attended ICANN47 in Durban.

We exchanged emails for a month prior to the meeting, sharing important PowerPoint presentations from the different ICANN constituencies, and exchanged tit-bits from the new and improved ICANN learn. http://learn.icann.org/

Unfortunately, the West bank fellow was not able to make it to London. Not withstanding, I hope to meet him in future, probably in LA. His dream is still valid.

“No matter where you come from, your dreams are valid.” – Lupita Nyong’o.

As for Jesus, he was very informed and focused, and knew many participants especially from Latin American region. His interest was more on GAC where he understood most issues especially because of his past engagement with ITU. This was puzzling because his background is ccTLD management. My thinking was he would have found ccNSO a natural home. We are still in contact via email, so let’s see how it turns out.

Thoughts on mentorships

What gets measured gets done.  This is just a beginning of a good thing, and the programme is superb.

  1. Timing of Guidelines to Mentors: A month is perfect, and the timing for initial engagement, 19th May was good.
  2. Guideline Package itself: It would be great if we can develop a mentorship guide, that new mentors can follow. In a matrix form, or something like that.
  3. One vs Two mentees: Two mentees are better. They can share with each other thoughts on the information given to them.
  4. Response and reaction from mentees: My mentee was very positive and eager to learn. He responded promptly to emails.
  5. Pre Meeting: I had a small meeting with my mentee where we exchanged expectations, and modes of participation at ICANN. I advised him to make a checklist of all sessions he wants to attend, and also make short notes, probably a paragraph on key takeaways for the meeting. This was to aid in report writing.
  6. At Meeting: We met in between sessions and evaluated effectiveness and relevance of the session.
  7. Post Meeting: We are still communicating via email, and finding the best ways for future participation in ICANN policy making activities.
  8. Does this need to be regional or based on compatible sectors: Compatible sector is better. It’s easier to engage on a professional level if you are from the same professional background.

Apart from the officially assigned mentors, I was able to interact and learn with many newcomers. Questions like “Are you are a member of ATLAS constituency?” were not uncommon but were met with fine answers on ICANN structures.

The fellows were lively and very eager to learn, from the knowledgeable Nabil of Morrocco, the young and intelligent Xiaohui of China, the friendly Martin Pablo of Argentina, the reflective Muchene of Kenya,  Amparo of Dominican who insisted I should pronounce her name with Latin romance accent РAmpaarooo,  Oarabile of Botswana who was oozing with life, to Adrian the key mobilizer. This is the perfect fraternity.

The leads Jeannie, Karel and Gao conducted the fellowship meeting very professionally, and the alumnae were quick to interject when called upon.

The ever smiling and warm Selina and Sarah (SS) were the perfect team for the ICANN newcomers booth. How Mama Janice picked two lovely people with extraordinary likable characters amazed me. No wonder visitors kept on going back to the ICANN booth.

 


On one of the meetings, our constituency ran late and exceeded the time allocated, eating into the time of the next group coming in. Apparently, the team that was before us also ate into our 10 minutes. If you add room transition times, we started 20 minutes late. To make matters interesting, Staff told us our meeting allocated time had been changed from 90 minutes to 60 minutes. We were virtually thrown out of the room, in a rather undiplomatic fashion I must add after our time was up.

I approached the Ombudsman  Chris LaHatte and his mate Herb Waye on seeking clarification on how such matters should be handled. After listening very carefully, he approached both teams and came up with this blog post.  

Lesson learned: I must acknowledge some meeting Chairs are terrible at controlling speakers who go on and on and on and on and on and on and on … Yawn


I made¬†good use of my extended stay in England and ¬†attended the UK IGF held on 1st July 2014 at St. Ermin’s hotel, London, England. The Nominet Chair Baroness Rennie Fritchie gave the sponsor’s welcoming remarks. She said “The IGF provides an opportunity for discussion, dialogue, divergent views, and encourages people to speak-up”. The event had about 50 participants. The Minister for Culture, Communication and the Creative Industries Hon. Ed Vaizey, MP appeared briefly to give his¬†keynote speech and fielded questions from participants.

At the UK IGF. Kivuva, Minister  Hon. Ed Vaizey, MP, and Adrian discussing bilateral relations

At the 2014 UK IGF. From Left Mwendwa Kivuva, Minister Hon. Ed Vaizey, MP, and Adrian Rodriguez

The agenda had 6 items:

  1. Net Governance: Net Mundial, London High Level Governance Meeting, now what?
  2. IANA functions
  3. Governance of cybersecurity
  4. IPv6
  5. Network filtering plenary
  6. Wrap-up and key takeaway from the IGF.

Despite the low turnout -(attributed to conference fatigue at ICANN) the discussions were healthy with key takeaways. The government was taken to task on her position on NetNeutrality, which she seemed to contradict herself with no clear position. However, the Minister stated UK is concerned on the kind of regulation being discussed in Europe that would stifle businesses. The IGF organizers were also not able to clearly indicate how the outcome of previous IGFs were used to influence policy, only stating that multistakeholderism and being able to talk to each other was part of the success of the IGF. The UK also stated she was able to adjust policy positions from outcomes of the IGF and have UK positions in bilateral talks with greater EU. However, there was no example given on these positions. Mr. Vaizey noted there is need to strengthen IGF locally and internationally.

UK Internet Governance position for the IGF

The session on Internet Governance landscape identified the following positions for the UK

  • Resist attempt to give priority to single stakeholders – have a more dynamic model
  • Keep the IGF open and balanced
  • Keep vested interests out of the process.
  • Have IGF outcomes stakeholders can take home to aid in capacity building.¬†Use IGF as a forum to address local problem.
  • Make the IGF more focused, and identify the big issues to be discussed.
  • The IGF is all about lobbying.¬†(Seems to contradict point 3. above)
  • True democratic governments are a minority
  • Looking for climatic help from state is the norm. It would be difficult to achieve multistakeholderism while states have more strength.
  • Focus on involving more businesses on the IGF. Content Providers, ISPs, and industries affected by ¬†the Internet.
  • Rebuild trust among stakeholders locally and internationally.

It was appreciated that the IGF landscape has changed greatly. For example, at NetMundial, all stakeholders were treated equally with Civil Society, private Sector, Government, and Technical Community all queuing up to the microphone to make their submissions. IANA stewardship was identified as a positive step taken by USG’s NTIA. A key point was that the idea of human rights has become more mainstream in Internet Governance.

One hindrance identified to multistakeholderism was the fact that not all stakeholders understand the issues being discusses. An example is eight out of nine US Supreme Court judged do not use emails. What kind of decisions would they make if IG issues were presented in their courts?

Relevance of the Istanbul IGF.

  • NetNeutrality will be a big debate in Istanbul.
  • Ongoing support for the IGF and fundraising.
  • How to make the IGF feel like an open platform.
  • How to achieve consensus to develop an outcome document from the IGF
  • The IGF offers capacity building, and many participants find answers to local problems.

The IPv6 Session

The session covered updates on IPv6 addressing use in UK and explored the potential barriers to it’s adoption. The panel was chaired by Olivier Cr√©pin-Leblond Chair of ISOC UK England, with panelists being Alain Fiocco of CISCO, Tim Chown of University of Southampton, and Adrian Kennard Andrew and Arnold Ltd.

It was noted that UK is trailing other European countries in roll-out of IPv6. The global growth of IPv6 roll-out was at around 8% as of 2014. The challenges identified that face the implementation of IpV6 were:

  1. Traditionally lack of Content on IPv6. It’s hard to convince people to use IPv6 without content hosted on it. Now there is massive content on IPv6 and clients need to access this content.
  2. There were few IPv6 transit providers. Now there are many directly commuter BGP transit points.
  3. In the past, there were Few equipment especially core routers and client premise equipment that supported IPv6. Now most devices are IPv6 compliant.
  4. There is a high cost of upgrading the Internet backbone to support IPv6 by large ISPs
  5. Bugs on equipment that were to be IPv6 compliant. Most equipment are now bug-free.
  6. Affordability of consumer routers. Low end routers did not have IPv6 support. Most of these technical hurdles have been solved already.
  7. lack of Operating System support. Now, most Operating Systems are IPv6 compliant.
  8. Use of Career Grade NAT (CGN) and Large Scale NAT (LSN) which are presented as IPv6. This prevents operators from rolling out pure IPv6 networks. The CGN is not scalable, and the end users have poor network experience.
  9. What is left? Cost of change. We need technical staff to understand issues around IPv6. Staff need to be trained including engineers, support team, and call center operators. There need to be more affordable equipment in the market that support IPv6. There need to be demand from the end users for IPv6 content, and IPv6 connectivity.

It was identified that as of July 2014, only 4% of the Internet  users had access to IPv6. The big players like Google, Wikipedia, Yahoo, Facebook, Microsoft, e.t.c are on IPv6. A key point was the driver for IPv6 roll-out seemed to be innovation and not demographics.

The Network filtering session came into a conclusion that education was more desirable in protecting minors online instead of blocking websites since the minors could still access the content from other devices elsewhere.

The wrap-up session was a Q&A session between Kate Russell, freelance Journalist and BBC Click presenter with Eleanor Bradley, CEO of Nominet.

NB: Key take-away from the IGF: Possible areas of research РIPv6 uptake in Kenyan Universities. Universities are agents of change in society, and they usually have good budget. Why are they not leading the way in implementing IPv6?


I believe Civil Society should come out strongly as genuine brokers for the national dialogue called by CORD coalition. After the entry of NARC government in power in 2002, civil society became extremely weakened because most of the activists and people of perceived good morals entered government leaving the Civil Society movement a shell. Since then, it has never recovered. It is time for us to redeem that image.

Give dialogue a chance

Civil Society should lead the national dialogue in Kenya – Image source Shutterstock

As a new breed of Civil Society activism enters the foray, it’s paramount they step up the fight for the common citizen as the Civil Society strive be relevant. It would be imprudent for Civil Society to remain sidelined in these intense times. Civil Society have a unique advantage of being respected by Kenyans regardless of political affiliation, tribe, and social standing. It is therefore my call for us to come out very strongly as the convener of national dialogue since we represent the genuine interests of the people.

Civil Society should come out strongly as a genuine broker and convener of national dialogue in Kenya.

The opposition and government alike only have their interests at heart as they lay conditions for the national dialogue. Demagogues and sycophants will take sides and incite their followers seeking their interests to be catered for in government at the expense of the people who feel the pinch of incompetent leadership.

Arise Civil Society and be felt in championing a better life for all Kenyans. It is our time to be counted.


My region has many Internet governance issues. I would like to handle the topic of “The Internet as an engine for growth and advancement. “

Access to the Internet can change lives of many people in the developing world producing plenty of opportunities for the youth, entrepreneurs, and other stakeholders. Access to the internet in Africa is primarily through mobile phones.

Many young people are unemployed, yet we can harness technology to assist them improve their livelihoods. Opportunities for the youth can be made possible through introduction of affordable phones, training the youth on mobile application development, incubation of youth businesses that are developing new innovative applications that run on mobile phones and finally, providing employment opportunities for these young innovators. Economic empowerment of the youth will lead to self sustainability of these nations. In the past few years, cost of mobile phones has decreased, enabling access to majority of citizens in developing countries. According to a research by iHub Research and Research Solutions Africa conducted in mid 2012, (Crandall, 2012) noted that ‚Äú16% of Kenyans at the BoP1 Internet on their mobile phone‚ÄĚ This has also been made possible because cellular companies have reduced cost of operating mobile phones by providing cheap calling rates and internet.

As the barriers to access of the phones have been broken, the youth have showed great innovation through development of applications. One such application in Kenya is the iCow that enable farmers to keep health records for their livestock. Other applications being considered will enable farmers get competitive markets for their produce through introduction of a commodities exchange market, and access of competitive market price information. Ushahidi on the other hand is an application that can solve crisis problems of crime, delinquency, and disasters by use of Crowdsourcing.

Opportunities for entrepreneurs can be made possible where governments are stable and they enact favorable policies and regulations for investors. This will attract major companies to establish bases in developing countries and provide funding to local startups. The firms will provide business solutions like mobile banking, provision of micro loans through mobiles,

and mobile money transfer services. A good innovation in the Kenyan market because of favorable business environment is the world famous M-PESA, a mobile money transfer platform.

For many of these positives to become a reality, policies and regulations that affect the access to phones and the internet should be formulated. In Kenya, counterfeit phones were switched off September 30th 2012. The communication commission ordered telecommunication operators to block phones that don’t have International Mobile Equipment Identity (IMEI ) number from accessing network services. The main reason was that the phones pose security risks to the country because the users cannot be tracked, and also counterfeits deny revenue to the genuine manufacturers. About 1.5million phones were switched off, affecting many users at BoP. (Chebusiri, 2012) Should Kenya have taken a different road? Such policies of locking out the poor from accessing the network only serve to enlarge the digital divide. The digital divide is not only about people of lower economic class not affording mobile phones and internet, but a research conducted by (Scott & McKemey, 2002) revealed that less women have access to phones and internet than men, and less educated people are likely to use these technology than those with high school diploma. Tracking mobile users‚Äô activities poses serious questions of privacy, and incline towards abuse of basic human rights.

Internet Service providers do bandwidth trottling to Peer to Peer (P2P) traffic especially when enforcing copyrights, or metering videos that clog their networks affecting the Quality of service (QOS) for the majority of average users. Accessing the internet through handheld phones as it is the case of developing countries tackles issues of net neutrality since mobile phones use less bandwidth, and they don’t have heavy applications that affect the QoS of other users.

All in all, developing nations should concentrate on having concrete policies, laws and regulation, having stable governments, educating the youth, and encouraging strategic investors to fund local businesses in the technology field. This will enable the nations to create more wealth and improve the livelihoods of their citizens, as well as benefit from foreign exchange and better balance of trade caused by exporting technology.

Bibliography

Chebusiri, W.w., 2012. BBC News – Kenya’s battle to switch off fake phones. [Online] Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-19819965 [Accessed 24 October 2012].Crandall, A., 2012.

How the Kenyan base of the pyramid uses their mobile phone | *iHub. [Online] Available at: http://www.ihub.co.ke/blog/2012/10/how-the-kenyan-base-of-the-pyramid-uses-their-mobile-phone

[Accessed 24 October 24].Scott, N. & McKemey, K., 2002. The use of Telephone in Rural and Low Income Communities in Africa. In 42nd Meeting of the CTO Council. London, 2002.


http://hosting.Kenya.or.ke

Domain transfer policy

KENIC has a very good mechanism for domain transfers between registrars. The process is as simple as 123. The domain owner aproaches the registrar of choice, and decides to transfer in, the registrar then puts an online request to the competitor to transfer out. If he refuses, there is a despute committee than can arbitrate. Of course the big players are the hardest to transfer out of, and also some quacks will never transfer a domain at all. This is an issue of ethics.

It is illogical to transfer an expired domain. You have to renew it first.

If you have paid for domain renewal and it has not been renewed, then you have been scammed. You can take the issue with KENIC desputes committee.

KENIC domain pricing

The KENIC pricing has been discussed at lengths. I used to advocate lower prices, but since I became an insider, I now know better. Look at the price of .x xx domain. At $60 translating at about KES4500 with more than 100,000, domains already booked, that’s $6M per year, while .org and .com costs KES800, enjoying millions of subscribers, thus giving them economies of scale. You will realise that KENIC survives on a shoe string budget. If you look at their balance sheets, you can’t help but pity them. According to this presentation by Kemibaro, .ke domains are not overpriced http://www.slideshare.net/kemibaro/kenya-network-information-centre-kenic-marketing-plan-for-201011

We only have paltry 30,000 .ke domains.

At some quarters, its has been argued that personal .me.ke domain should be given out for free for the first year. Maybe even .sc.ke and .ne.ke. I think that would be a brilliant marketing strategy, then go back to 500bob per year thereafter.

Anybody advocating for lowering of .ke prices should also at the same time come up with a survival tactic for KENIC. How they will pay their staff and maintain the servers.

I would suggest that KENIC start offering hosting, colocation, consultancy, and such related services. But again such divergence might bring about conflict of interest.

Barrack Otieno, hit the nail directly on the head when he declared, ‘ask not what KENIC has done for you, but what you have done for KENIC’. As registrars we are always faced with the choice of whether to give our clients a ccTLD or gTLD. Most of us opt for gTLD because we are saving some few cents. After doing a market survey, I realised that most established registrar charge the same amount for either gTLD or ccTLD. We need concerted effort and willingness by the registrar to convince clients to take our .ke ccTLD, only then, shall we prosper as a registry

We Kenyans should start feeling proud of our ‘identity’. I think the patriotic card can be played well to convince people to take our local domains. The marking strategy of ‘zingine ni COMmon’ was very good. It should be revived. We should also convince our politicians to take .ke domain when they are launching their campaign websites. In that way, the population will be exposed to the .ke brand.

Register .co.ke .or.ke domains at KES950, use coupon code 950.

The most affordable .ke domains in the world. Register .ke domain from transworldafrica.com


The Kenya Network Information Center (KENIC) lowered domain registration fees of some domain. I was vexed since they left the .co.ke and .or.ke prefixes in the cold, but all the same Transworld computer Channels got recognition from Business daily Africa

Here is the post made to Skunkworks

KENIC

Well done Kenic.

But you have thought this out from the wrong perspective, and got all priorities wrong. You have subsidized for the rich, and left the poor. Surely, who can afford a domain more? A government institution (.go.ke), an educational institution (.ac.ke), or an individual .co.ke .ne.ke)? You are working against all the principles of Robin Hood

“KENIC Stealing from the poor, giving to the rich”

KENIC, do you know how many people opt to register .com, .org, and .net domains because the price of .ke is NOT within reach? I understand that about 80% of .ke domains come from .co.ke, and Kenic is not ready to loose that revenue, as it is self sustaining, but if the cost of .co.ke domains is lowered, you will achieve 100,000 domains within several years, and your revenue stream will still be excellent due to the volumes.

I think KENIC’S, greediness has been its own undoing. Our company has registered hundreds of websites, and only a handful are .ke because the clients, who are usually young .COMS securing their digital space are put off at the obscene local domains pricing, opting for the cheaper gTLD.

Was Kenic’s initial mandate “PROFIT MAKING”, and why are they masquarading with a holy .OR.KE domain name? KENIC’s initial aim was “to institute a local non-profit organization to manage and operate the .KE ccTLD.”

Why have you deviated from it?

Register .ke domain from transworldafrica.com


What the list of the super-rich dropouts signifies is that in business, a top degree is not as important as having the right aptitude, attitude, determination, vision, and consistency.

Nearly all this dropouts are philanthropists in the educational sector. They don’t want you dropping out and becoming a competitor.

A college dropout is someone who has matriculated in an institution of higher learning, but has left his or her studies unfinished without the intention of completing.

College Dropout Parental Advisory Misleading Content. Do not drop out of college.

The BIG question is “what % of college dropouts become millionaires? 0.5%? Maybe 1%” These people HERE are just exceptions, although you can join the COLLEGE DROPOUTS ALUMNI ASSOCIATION! here

This has become, in some cases, a status symbol given the success of some famous college dropouts.

Please read on to get captivated.
The bottom line, NEVER GIVE UP. You also can make it

Follow up:

Michael Saul Dell

Michael Saul Dell (born February 23, 1965 in Houston, Texas) is the founder of Dell, Inc., the world’s largest computer manufacturer.
Dell is the son of an orthodontist and grew up in a well-to-do Jewish family. He had his first encounter with a computer at the age of 15 when he broke down a brand new Apple II computer and rebuilt it, just to see if he could. Dell attended Memorial High School in Houston, Texas, where he did not excel scholastically. Reportedly one of his teachers, still currently teaching there, commented to him that he “would probably never go anywhere in life.”
After graduating high school, he attended the University of Texas at Austin intending to become a physician. While at the university, he started a computer company called PC’s Limited in his room in Dobie Center.[1]
The company became successful enough that, with the help of an additional loan from his grandparents, Dell dropped out of college at the age of 19 to run the business full-time. In 1987, PC’s Limited changed its name to Dell Computer Corporation. Over time, and despite a number of setbacks (including laptops that caught on fire in 1993, temporarily losing the consumer market to Gateway in the mid 1990’s, and others), Dell survived to become the most profitable PC manufacturer in the world, with sales of US$49 billion and profits of US$3 billion in 2004. As Dell expanded its product line to more than computers shareholders voted to rename the corporation Dell, Inc. in 2003. On March 4, 2004, he stepped down as CEO of Dell but stayed as chairman of the board, while Kevin Rollins, then president and COO, became president and CEO.
Accolades for Dell include: “Entrepreneur of the Year” from Inc. magazine; “Man of the Year” from PC Magazine; “Top CEO in American Business” from Worth Magazine; “CEO of the Year” from Financial World and Industry Week magazines.
In the 2005 publication of the Forbes 400, Dell was listed as the 4th richest man in the United States and the 18th richest in the world with net assets of around US$18 billion. Dell resides in Austin, Texas with his wife, Susan, and their four children. Dell reportedly owns the 15th largest home in the world, worth an estimated US$18.7 million.

William Henry “Bill” Gates III

William Henry “Bill” Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is the co-founder, chairman, former chief software architect, and former CEO of Microsoft Corporation. He is also the founder of Corbis, a digital image archiving company. The Forbes international rich list has ranked him as the world’s richest person for the last twelve years straight. In 1999, Gates’ wealth briefly surpassed $100 billion making him America’s first centibillionaire.[3] According to the Forbes 2004 magazine, Bill Gates’s net worth was approximately $46.6 billion. When family wealth is considered, his family ranks second behind the Walton family.Bill gates
Gates is one of the best-known entrepreneurs of the personal computer revolution. He is widely respected for his foresight and ambition.[6][7] He is also frequently criticized as having built Microsoft through unfair or unlawful business practices. Since amassing his fortune, Gates has pursued a number of philanthropic endeavors, donating large amounts of money (about 52% of his total fortune) to various charitable organizations and scientific research programs through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, founded in 2000. In June 2006 he announced that he would move to a part-time role with Microsoft (namely surrendering the power of managing day-to-day operations) in 2008 to begin a career in philanthropy, but will remain as chairman.
Bill Gates, his wife Melinda and U2’s lead singer Bono were collectively named by Time as the 2005 Persons of the Year for their humanitarian efforts. That same year he was made an honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II. In 2006, Gates Foundation was awarded the Premio Pr√≠ncipe de Asturias en Cooperaci√≥n Internacional. In a list compiled by the magazine New Statesman in 2006, he was voted eighth in the list of “Heroes of our time”.[8]

Paul Gardner Allen was born in Seattle, Washington, to Kenneth S. Allen, an associate director of the University of Washington libraries, and Faye G. Allen. Allen attended Lakeside School, a prestigious private school in Seattle, and befriended Bill Gates, who was two years his junior but shared a common enthusiasm for computers. Together they monopolized the use of Lakeside School’s single minicomputer. In need of more computing power, Allen and Gates snuck into the University of Washington computer labs. They were caught but struck an agreement with lab administrators by providing free computer help to students. After graduation, Allen attended Washington State University, though he dropped out after two years to pursue his dream of writing software commercially for the new “personal computers”. He later convinced Bill Gates to drop out of Harvard College to found Microsoft.

And here’s something you probably didn’t know:

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation currently provides 90 per cent of the world budget for the attempted eradication of polio.

Paul Gardner Allen

Paul Gardner Allen (born January 21, 1953) is an American entrepreneur who established himself by co-founding Microsoft with Bill Gates. He regularly appears on lists of the richest people in the world; as of 2006 he is ranked by Forbes magazine as the sixth richest, worth an estimated $22.7 billion, of which $5 billion is in Microsoft stock. He is the Chairman of Charter Communications and is a shareholder in Dreamworks Animation. He was recently invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS).
Allen also owns two professional sports teams: The Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League and the Portland Trail Blazers of the National Basketball Association.
He currently resides in Mercer Island, WA, USA.
Paul Allen has been single for his whole life. In 2005 New York Daily News reported that Paul Allen had been dating actress and former beauty queen Laura Harring co star of Mulholland Drive (movie) for about 6 months.

Lawrence Joseph Ellison

Lawrence Joseph Ellison (born August 17, 1944) is the co-founder and CEO of Oracle Corporation, a major database software firm.

Ellison was born in New York City to Florence Spellman, a 19-year-old unwed mother who later placed her nine-month old son for adoption to her distant relatives. Lillian and Louis Ellison took him into their home, a two-bedroom apartment located in a modest lower middle class Jewish neighborhood in South Chicago. Ellison recalled to an interviewer that he had a warm and loving mother opposite to an austere and unsupportive father. At South Shore High School, he was a bright but inattentive student. At 15, he began a long-term relationship that lasted for five years and ended sorely‚ÄĒdepending on whom is asked, he unsuccessfully proposed marriage either once or twice. He lasted until the end of his sophomore year at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign but dropped out following Lillian’s death. After a summer in Northern California, he returned home to study at the University of Chicago but left after one quarter. Ending his attempts to finish college, he set out for California.

Ellison is reported to be one of the richest people in America by Forbes. In 2005, Forbes reported that Ellison has a net worth of around $18.4 billion, making him the ninth richest man in the world. For a short period in 2000, Ellison was the richest man in the world.[2] (In interviews, Ellison notes that his actual wealth — money that he could actually spend — is more like two billion dollars, and that if he tried to sell all his Oracle stock to realize his “net worth” the price of Oracle stock would fall to zero.) The book titled The Difference Between God and Larry Ellison: Inside Oracle Corporation [3] has been published on him.
At his Woodside estate, Ellison married Melanie Craft, a romance novelist, on 18 December 2003. At the wedding, his friend, Apple CEO Steve Jobs, was the official photographer. Craft is Ellison’s fourth wife. He has a son and a daughter by a previous wife.
Private jet
Ellison has had several run-ins with San Jose Mineta International Airport concerning the noise from his private jet. The city of San Jose has a limitation on late night takeoffs and landings on planes weighing more than 75,000 pounds (34 tonnes), and Ellison has received several citations. In 2001, he was granted a personal waiver from this law.

* In 2004, Forbes listed the charitable donations of the wealthiest 400, and it showed Larry Ellison donates about 1% of his personal wealth – $151,092,103.

Stephen “Woz” Wozniak

Stephen “Woz” Wozniak (born August 11, 1950) is an American computer engineer turned philanthropist. His inventions and machines are credited with contributing greatly to the personal computer revolution of the 1970s. Wozniak co-founded Apple Computer with Steve Jobs in 1976 and created the Apple I and Apple II computers in the mid-1970s. The Apple II became the best selling computer of the 1970s and early 1980s, and is often credited as the first popular personal computer. Wozniak has several nicknames, including “(The) Woz” and “Wizard of Woz”. “WoZ” (short for “Wheels of Zeus”) is also the name of a company Wozniak founded. Woz also designed the classic Atari game Breakout. He is known for his introverted character, and he finds his level of celebrity somewhat annoying. He is also known as the “Other Steve” of Apple Computer, which is an obvious reference to the fact that he is a less famous “Steve” of Apple next to Steve Jobs.
Conclusion?

Steven Paul Jobs

Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is currently the CEO of Apple Computer and is a leading figure in both the computer and entertainment industries. He co-founded Apple Computer with Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne in 1976, both which are of Jewish and Middle eastern descents. Jobs helped popularize the concept of the personal computer with the Apple II, and was one of the first to see the commercial potential of the GUI and mouse. He oversaw the integration of these technologies into the Apple Macintosh. He has also led Apple Computer through its recent resurgence.

“I do what is right at the moment” Steve jobs

Jobs has also been the Chairman and CEO of Pixar Animation Studios since its inception. Pixar is an independent film production company that has produced acclaimed animated shorts and features such as The Incredibles and Toy Story. It was recently acquired by The Walt Disney Company for $7.4 billion in stock. The transaction has made Jobs Disney’s largest individual shareholder and has given him a seat on Disney’s board of directors.

Jobs attended Cupertino Middle School and Homestead High School in Cupertino, California, and frequented after-school lectures at the Hewlett-Packard Company in Palo Alto, California. He was soon hired there and worked with Steve Wozniak as a summer employee. In 1972, Jobs graduated from high school and enrolled in Reed College in Portland, Oregon, but he dropped out after only one semester. When speaking at a Stanford University graduation ceremony in 2005, Jobs ironically said to the new college graduates that, after dropping out, he remained at Reed auditing classes, including one in calligraphy. “If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts,” he said.

When the then twenty-one-year-old Jobs saw a computer that Wozniak had designed for his own use, he convinced Woz to assist him and started a company to market the computer. Apple Computer Co. was founded as a partnership on April 1, 1976. Though their initial plan was to sell just printed circuit boards, Jobs and Wozniak ended up creating a batch of completely assembled computers, and entered the personal computer business. The first personal computer Jobs and Wozniak introduced was called the Apple I. It sold for $666.66 (in reference to the phone number of Wozniak’s Dial-a-joke). Its successor, the Apple II, was introduced the following year and became a huge success, turning Apple into an important player in the nascent personal computer industry. In May of 1980, Apple Computer released the Apple III, which met with less than stellar success, but in December of that year, with a successful IPO, Apple Computer became a publicly traded corporation, further boosting Jobs’s stature.
As Apple continued to grow, the company began looking for an experienced executive to help manage its expansion. In 1983, Jobs lured John Sculley away from Pepsi-Cola, to serve as Apple’s CEO, challenging him, “Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water, or do you want to change the world?” That same year, Apple also released the technologically advanced but commercially unsuccessful Lisa.

January 24, 1984 saw the introduction of the Macintosh, the first commercially successful computer with a graphical user interface influenced by Xerox PARC. The development of the Mac was started by Jef Raskin, and eventually taken over lock, stock, and pirate flag, by Jobs. The success of the Macintosh product line eventually led Apple to abandon the Apple II.

Robert Edward “Ted” Turner III

Robert Edward “Ted” Turner III (born November 19, 1938) is an American media mogul and philanthropist. He is best known for founding TBS and CNN, and his $1 billion pledge to the United Nations donated through his United Nations Foundation. Turner’s penchant for making controversial statements has earned him the nickname “The Mouth of the South.”
Turner’s media empire began with his father’s billboard business which he took over at the age of 24 after his father’s suicide. The billboard business, Turner Outdoor Advertising, was worth approximately one million dollars when Turner took it over in 1963. Purchase of an Atlanta UHF station in 1970 began the assemblage of the Turner Broadcasting System. His Cable News Network revolutionized news media, coming to the fore covering the space shuttle Challenger disaster in 1986 and the Persian Gulf War in 1991. Turner was also in the news for his much publicized marriage to Jane Fonda as well as their subsequent divorce.

Turner was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. When he was nine years old, his family moved to Savannah, Georgia. He attended the McCallie School, an unaffiliated Christian prep school in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Colorful episodes from his life include being expelled from Brown University for having a female visitor in his room in 1960. At the university, Turner was an unspectacular student in class, though he was vice-president of the Brown Debating Union.

He is America’s largest private landowner, owning approximately two million acres (8,000 km¬≤), which is greater than the land areas of the two smallest states of Delaware and Rhode Island combined. According to documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, Turner’s land has a higher gross domestic product than the country of Belize. He also has the largest private bison herd in the world, with 40,000 head. In 2002, Turner co-founded Ted’s Montana Grill, a restaurant chain specializing in burgers made from fresh ground bison meat. In addition, Ted Turner is the founder of Cartoon Network.

Under his ownership, World Championship Wrestling became the only federation in history to outrate and outsell the McMahon family and their World Wrestling Federation.

After the American-led boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympics, Turner founded the Goodwill Games as a statement for peace through sport.
In 1998, Turner gave $1 billion in Time Warner stock to United Nations causes, founding the United Nations Foundation.

Ray Kroc

Many consider Ray Arthur Kroc (1902-1984) to be the founder of McDonald’s Corporation. This is not true. The restaurant chain was actually started by brothers Dick and Mac McDonald, 15 years before Kroc.
That, however, is not the point. Even though the brothers established the principles of the fast-food restaurant, Kroc is the one who recognised its potential, buying them out in 1961 for a mere $2.7 million.
From ambulance driver to Hamburger King, Kroc dabbled in all kinds of trades. He happened to meet the McDonald brothers while working as a milkshake machine salesman.
He also tried, unsuccessfully, to convince another ambulance driver called Walt Disney to let him open a restaurant in the latter’s new venture, Disneyland.
When Time magazine released its list of the world’s most influential titans of industry, Kroc was prominently featured. He had, during his lifetime, amassed a fortune worth $500 million.

Henry Ford

Founder of the Ford Motor Company, Henry Ford (1863-1947) is better known for his hand in creating the American middle class.
He managed this by applying the concept of assembly line manufacturing to the mass production of affordable cars, promptly revolutionizing industrial production.
Born to Irish immigrants, Henry was the eldest of six children. He left home at 16 to work as an apprentice machinist, married, tried a bit of farming, ran a sawmill, experimented with internal combustion engines and eventually formed the Detroit Automobile Company with a few other investors.
When the company went bankrupt, he formed the Henry Ford Company, but was forced out by investors. He returned with the Ford Motor Company.
Even if you aren’t a fan of the fabulous Model T, here’s something everyone should thank Ford for. In 1926, he instituted the five-day, 40-hour work week. And the modern weekend was born.

Andrew Carnegie

Industrialist and philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919) is better known, today, as the steel tycoon who started over 2,800 libraries. His rags-to-riches tale is also among the most famous in American history.
After moving to Pennsylvania from Scotland, a teenage Carnegie worked hard in factories, invested his money wisely and, within a span of four decades, managed to gain control of a number of manufacturing plants that grew to become the Carnegie Steel Company.
He is equally — if not more — famous for his donations of over $350 million to further public education: an ironic gesture coming from a dropout.
The author Dale Carnegie was a distant relative, gaining fame for his 1937 bestseller, How to Win Friends and Influence People. And here’s another titbit to chew on: During the American Civil War, Andrew Carnegie avoided the battlefield by paying a replacement the sum of $850.

He is technically the founder of world renown Carnegie Mellon University

Kirk Kerkorian

Born in 1917, this Nevada billionaire is President and CEO of Tracinda Corporation. That may not ring a bell, considering he’s better known for two other things. One: Being one of the pioneers who shaped the city of Las Vegas as we know it. Two: Coming up with the concept of Megaresort – a resort integrating the services of a hotel and casino with dining, entertainment and shopping into a single venue.
Kerkorian was born to Armenian immigrant parents. He was a skilled amateur boxer who went on to fly airplanes, founding Transinternational Airlines and selling it for $104 million.
He first visited Vegas in 1944, as a pilot, and eventually bought a place there that eventually grew to accommodate the world famous Caesars Palace.
To cut a really long story short, he now owns and operates a great many properties, apart from other business ventures. And his is a tale that’s not over yet.

Richard Branson

British entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson (1950-) is known for the Virgin brand, one that has seen success in all kinds of ventures.
His tale begins in 1970, the year he started a record mail order. A record shop in London came next, followed by the launch of Virgin Records in 1972. Virgin Atlantic Airways was formed in 1984, and Virgin Mobile launched in 1999.
Another thing this businessman is known for is his eccentric promotional habits. He has made a number of attempts, unsuccessfully, to fly around the world in a hot air balloon! In 2004, Virgin Galactic was launched — to take passengers into sub-orbital space.
Brandon supposedly considered running for Mayor of London in 2004, but decided not to. When the 2002 list of 100 Greatest Britons was announced, he stood tall at Number 85.

Dhirubhai Ambani

Dhirajlal Hirachand Ambani (1932-2002) was born into the family of a schoolteacher. It was a family of modest means. When he turned 16, Dhirubhai moved to Aden, working first as a gas-station attendant, then as a clerk in an oil company.
He returned to India at 26, starting a business with a meagre capital of $375. By the time of his demise, his company – Reliance Industries Ltd – had grown to become an empire, with an estimated annual turnover of $12 billion!
Dhirubhai was, in his lifetime, conferred the Indian Entrepreneur of the 20th Century Award by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry. A Times of India poll in the year 2000 also voted him one of the biggest creators of wealth in this century.
Dhirubhai’s is not just the usual rags-to-riches story. He will be remembered as the one who rewrote Indian corporate history and built a truly global corporate group. He is also credited with having single-handedly breathed life into the Indian stock markets and bringing in thousands of investors to the bourses.

Subhash Chandra Goel

Here’s something not many people know about Subhash Chandra Goel: The Zee chairman dropped out after standard 12.
Subhash Chandra started his own vegetable oils unit at 19. It was, in a manner of speaking, his first job. Years later, a casual visit to a friend at Doordarshan gave him the idea of starting his own broadcasting company. We all know how that story ran.
Chandra knew nothing about programming, distribution or film rights. What he did understand quite well was the Indian sensibility though. Funded by UK businessmen, Zee came into being as India’s first satellite TV network.
Today, it reaches 32 million homes, connecting with 200 million people in South Asia alone. The network also covers Asians in America, the Middle East, Europe, Australia and Africa, making this dropout a very rich one

It only seems it is men who drop out and succeed? So ladies, keep up with the books.

Nearly all this dropouts are philanthropists in the educational sector. They don’t want you dropping out and becoming a competitor.